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Hatchling Power!

Discussion in 'Debatable Topics' started by Vishnu2, Jul 6, 2013.

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  1. Vishnu2

    Vishnu2 Member

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    What are the benefits of getting a hatchling vs a 4 or 2 year old tort? Russian or Greek.. Opinions?

    Thanks

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  2. Jlant85

    Jlant85 Well-Known Member

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    Older one are a lot more easier I care for. Specially when your new to the tortoise world. That's just my thought. I would go into details but I'm on my phone so ill post more about it a little later.
  3. Tom

    Tom The Dog Trainer 5 Year Member

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    The benefit would be getting to watch them grow up, knowing their exact age and knowing exactly how it was raised and fed.
  4. kanalomele

    kanalomele Active Member 5 Year Member

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    With a Russian or Greek the adult/juvenile care is similar to a hatchling but not exactly the same. My hatchlings get a higher humidity in a glass indoor closed chamber and their food gets chopped. They are removed, soaked and sunbathed everyday. All of my adults live outside yearround and are encouraged to forage for themselves. So hatchlings are more delicate and exacting with a greater chance of failure.
  5. Greg T

    Greg T Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    When I started, I went for yearlings because the hard work is basically done. Hatchlings require more attention and the first year is toughest. The daily soaks, feeding more often, cleaning the enclosure more often, etc. So getting an older one is easier, especially if these are a child's pet.

    BUT, now that I have hatchlings, I can definitely see the other side too. Yes they require a lot of work, but darn they are cute and you get to watch them grow and develop personalities. You get to control their environment and food so you know they get raised properly.

    It is a hard choice!! :D
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